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How 2 Stitch a Double Varsity Raggy Design

Posted by Janay on 8/26/2015
Raggy-style applique designs are constructed in a slightly different manner than traditional appliqué designs. Below are the general directions for completing a letter using our Double Varsity Raggy Alphabet (Double Varsity Raggy Numbers follow the same directions and are sold separately).

You will need two different fabric prints to achieve this look, precut larger than the letter by about an inch. See below for suggestions and samples. In these directions we used two colors of quilter’s cotton layered with flannel.

Run Step 1 of the design, a single running stitch to show fabric placement for the bottom layer.


Lay a generous piece of fabric over the placement stitch (at least half an inch of extra fabric all around the design)


Run Step 2 of the design, which is a double running stitch to tack down the fabric followed immediately by a bean stitch.


Run Step 3 of the design, a single running stitch to show fabric placement for the top layer.


Lay a second generous piece of fabric over the placement stitch (at least half an inch of extra fabric all around the design)


Run Step 4 of the design, which is a double running stitch to tack down the fabric followed immediately by a bean stitch.


The embroidery design is now done and it’s time to trim. Leaving a quarter-inch seam allowance, trim around the outside edge of the top layer of fabric.


If the letter or number has a hole in the middle (A, B, D, O, P, Q, R, 4, 6, 8, 9 and 0), carefully snip a starting point in middle of the hole, only cutting the top layer of fabric. I personally love these Havel's Snip-A-Stitch 4-1/2-Inch Scissors for hooking into the weave of the top fabric and snipping. (Some embroiderers prefer to use a seam ripper, some even pre-snip the fabric before tacking it down in step 4.)


Trim away the hole leaving the bottom fabric exposed.


Then trim around the outside edge of the bottom fabric.


To start the ragging/fraying effect, you can snip the edges and rough them up with your fingernail. It will get fluffier with each machine washing.


There are multiple looks you can achieve with this style of font:
Depending on how raggy you want it to look, you can add a layer of flannel underneath each fabric, as shown in the picture above, as well as this one:


This sample shows a layer of fleece under the cotton:


These samples shows a layer of colored flannel under the cotton:



How much of a seam allowance you leave also affects the look. Leave an 1/8 inch or a 1/4 inch or a 1/2 inch, it really depends on how raggy you want it.


You could use a fusible product like Heat-n-Bond Lite, trim relatively close to the tack down lines and when finished fuse the fabric to the base item. That will give a more polished look and will not really be raggy at all, as in these samples:



If you use knit, felt or fleece instead of something woven, it won't really fray and that will give a different look. This sample uses felt:


Combine the alphabet and numbers to make a sporty shirt!


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